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How to Repaint an already painted epoxy floors

Sydneysiders care about their property—and it’s not a mega-fact. But housework may get a bit tricky and leave the homeowners with questions such as how to repaint the garage floor? Or how to clean the painted epoxy floors? So, here we are again to lend a helping hand as usual.

woman in black sports bra while standing near window
Photo by Andrea Piacquadio on Pexels.com

Our Epoxy Floors team has provided a manual for almost any sort of Epoxy floors you may face. And this one right here will teach you how to repaint your parking lot base by the book.

Washing Chapter
First things first, you cannot repaint a dirty base. All the things that will cause painting failure can eventually stop the substance to stick to the ground and ruin your work. So, wash off the area thoroughly prior to starting other stages. Here’s a how-to guide for that.

Use a broom to get rid of the visible dust, dirt, and filth. Take this part seriously and try to remove as much dirt as possible. In case the place is contaminated for a long time, vacuum the area.
Make sure no stains or spills are left on the ground. Read our guide on how to clean oil spill on Epoxy garage floor for more information.
Use a bucket of lukewarm water and scrub the place all over again. When you are sure that there’s no contaminator on the ground, rinse the place and leave it to dry.
Finally, since the contaminators can hide in the cracks, you have to pressure wash them. So, use a high-pressure hose and remove the loose concrete segment as well as any other intruders.
Sanding Chapter
Scraping the space before applying the paint is the most vital task. The main reason why many homeowners fail to repaint the Epoxy garage floor is that they neglect this chapter. Therefore, we recommend you to follow the instructions below thoroughly so as to avoid failure in repainting the parking lot base. There are 3 techniques to remove the old paint from the concrete ground.

Method One: Using a Buffer
A buffer may not seem like a proper tool for this task. However, with a minor adjustment, it can turn into a commercial grinder! First, you need to attach a sanding disc to the buffing pad to create your own sander. (Both are available at supply stores). Then, you can turn the buffer on and use it as a gigantic sander to remove the old paint, making the ground seem completely smooth.

Method Two: Acid Washing
A mixture of 4-part acid 1-part water (1:1 ratio) is a good solution for taking the former coating material away. So, make your own mixture and scrub it to the space using a broom or long-handled brush. Let the solution soak in for 2-5 minutes and then wash off the place methodically, being sure that the acid-water substance is fully removed. (Click here for more information about Acid etching technique).

Method Tree: Manual Sanding
Well, this old-school method doesn’t need any specific explanations. Just use a random orbital, belt, or palm sander and smooth the area, removing all the ex-paint! But keep in mind that this technique won’t suit commercial flooring where everything is in industrial scales.

Painting Chapter
Now that you prepped the place for a brand-new coating material, here’s what you need to do:

Cut in around the edges and create your virtual canvas. This would show you where to start the painting and vice versa. But be careful to choose the starting point carefully. You don’t want to stand on the wet paint to reach other areas, do you?
Roll the paint as fast and thoroughly as possible. Most water-based paints get dry fast and this may cause major problems. So, try to finish each section off before it’s too late.
Let it dry for 24 hours before anyone steps on it. Otherwise, footprints will ruin the whole work.
Now, repaint the surface all over again to get the finest outcome. And finally, let it dry for 7 days before driving your car into the parking lot.

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